July 20, 2024
A Los Angeles man accused of driving the wrong way on Shoreline Drive in Long Beach, running a red light and crashing into pedestrians and other vehicles — killing a woman — now faces a murder charge a week after he pleaded not guilty to voluntary manslaughter.

A Los Angeles man accused of driving the wrong way on Shoreline Drive in Long Beach, running a red light and crashing into pedestrians and other vehicles — killing a woman — now faces a murder charge a week after he pleaded not guilty to voluntary manslaughter, according to court records.

Khalid Yagobbi, 46, was taken back into custody after a hearing at the Long Beach Superior Courthouse on Tuesday, Oct. 24, court and inmate records show. He was being held on $6 million bail.

In addition to murder, Yagobbi also faces four counts of attempted murder and four counts of assault with a deadly weapon.

Yagobbi was driving for Uber and behind the wheel of a Chevrolet Bolt with a passenger in the car, prosecutors say, when he ran the red light at Aquarium Way on Oct. 14.

Police say Yagobbi did not slow down as he approached the intersection.

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Killed in the crash was Romelia Cuarenta-Aguilar, 60. Witnesses said she was pushing a stroller when struck. Several others were hospitalized.

Yagobbi was initially charged with voluntary manslaughter and pleaded not guilty to the charge on Oct. 17. He was released two days later after posting a $50,000 bond, inmate records show.

Those charges were changed prior to Tuesday’s hearing, court records show. It was not yet known what led prosecutors to file the more-serious charges.

Police said after Yagobbi’s arrest they believed the crash was intentional, but said there was no indication it was an act of terror or associated with the ongoing violence in the Middle East.

A possible motive has not been disclosed. Police, and prosecutors, have not said why they believe the crash was intentional.

But the harshest charge now — murder — mirrors what police had initially arrested Yagobbi on: suspicion of murder.

 

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