May 28, 2024
In the National Weather Service's 48-hour totals ending at 7 a.m. Monday, many stations in the San Gabriel and San Bernardino mountains had readings of 5 to 6 inches.

The mountains near Los Angeles and San Diego recorded the most rain as Tropical Storm Hilary swept into Southern California over the weekend.

In the National Weather Service’s 48-hour totals ending at 7 a.m. Monday, many stations in the San Gabriel and San Bernardino mountains had readings of 5 to 6 inches.

Mount San Jacinto, above Palm Springs, had a reading of 11.6, and Upper Mission Creek, 10 miles southeast of Big Bear, had 13.54. These are raw data, not yet subjected to quality control.

Stovepipe Wells, in Death Valley, and Red Rock Canyon, near Las Vegas, both recorded about 3 inches in those 48 hours. Downtown Las Vegas reported 0.63 inches.

The storm’s effects petered out in the southern Sierra Nevada. Yosemite Valley reported 0.44 inches, Mammoth Lakes and Donner Lake 0.84, and Reno 0.31.

Some 48-hour readings:

Location
Inches

Lake Arrowhead
8.31

Mt. Laguna
7.11

Palomar Mountain
6.84

Santa Anita Dam
6.53

Cajon Pass
6.31

Mt. Baldy
5.84

Newhall
5.71

Castaic Junction
5.47

Burbank
5.07

Palmdale
5.07

Lake Piru
4.76

Lake Isabella
4.6

Big Bear Lake
4.51

Malibu Hills
4.33

Tehachapi
4.16

Bel-Air
4.14

I-5 Grapevine
3.38

Los Angeles downtown
3.34

Palm Springs
3.23

Stovepipe Wells
3.01

Red Rock Canyon NV
2.91

Long Beach
2.71

LAX
2.55

San Bernardino
2.45

Santa Ana
1.91

San Diego airport
1.82

Mammoth Lakes
0.84

Yosemite Valley
0.44

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