February 26, 2024
It would give my work more visibility but I'd be dealing with her high-maintenance personality.

DEAR HARRIETTE: I have been spending time recently with a powerful woman in my field who has asked me to do some work with her in the fall. This is an incredible opportunity that may be very good for my brand. Being aligned with her will take my work to a much more visible, high-profile level.

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Harriette Cole: Was I rude to this woman I passed in the restaurant?

The problem is that this woman is high-maintenance and intense. She has a short attention span and is often all over the place.

How can I make it work for me to take her up on this offer when I worry that I will just get swept up in her intensity?

— Is It Worth It?

DEAR IS IT WORTH IT? Spend some time mapping out a plan for what you envision happening during the time you might work with this woman.

Figure out what will allow you the ability to fulfill whatever responsibilities you have discussed and what goals and vision this woman has for your engagement. Create a proposal that clearly outlines what your role would be, what success looks like and what your compensation would be.

Present your plan to this woman and discuss it in detail. Be clear about everything, including boundaries on your time.

Know that it may be difficult to work with her sometimes. You already are fully aware that she requires a lot of attention. If you think it could be worth it, go for it with a written contract in place that outlines expectations and next steps, including what the end of the working relationship might look like.

DEAR HARRIETTE: I have been putting off going to the doctor for several years now. I have a few aches and pains, nothing too bad, but my family history is not great.

I don’t really want to know if there’s anything wrong with me. I have lousy insurance and no dependents. I figure whatever my health is will be good enough for as long as I live.

I know that sounds nuts, but if I find out that there’s something wrong with me, I don’t have the money or inclination to do anything about it anyway. That’s why I figure being ignorant about it is better.

My best friend at work who gets a physical every year thinks I have lost my mind. She tells me that I should at least know what’s going on in my body. What do you think?

— Get a Checkup

DEAR GET A CHECKUP: I believe that knowledge is power.

Rather than thinking the worst and doing nothing about it, why not get a physical with complete blood work and have a baseline understanding for the state of your health?

American medicine is great at diagnostics. Use the system to support you. Find out how you are doing. Learn whether there are any issues that need to be addressed.

Sometimes doctors can give you recommendations for vitamins, dietary adjustments and fitness programs that can work wonders for improving your health. Other times, they may notice more substantive concerns.

Even if you learn that you have a serious health challenge, the doctor cannot force you to tend to it, but know that early detection often means a much less costly treatment plan.

Harriette Cole is a lifestylist and founder of DREAMLEAPERS, an initiative to help people access and activate their dreams. You can send questions [email protected] or c/o Andrews McMeel Syndication, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106.

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